Netball Ja not in the red – Bernard

first_imgMarva Bernard, the immediate past president of Netball Jamaica (NJ), is refuting a statement made by incumbent president Dr Paula Daley Morris that the organisation is in the red. Bernard, who stepped down as president last weekend after 10 years at the helm of Netball Jamaica, said that while the organisation is in need of funding, it is by no means in the red. Daley Morris, who was officially sworn in as president during NJ’s annual general meeting on Saturday, during an interview with The Gleaner, published on Wednesday, November 18, in reference to the financial standing of the organisation, was quoted saying: “My biggest challenge is funding. We are in the red, and it’s not easy to take over something in the red, and that is why we have got to get a handle on things so we can come out of the red.” But according to Bernard, while Netball Jamaica is not awash with cash, it is not in debt. In an email obtained by The Gleaner, which was sent out to members of Netball Jamaica’s hierarchy, Bernard stated, “In response to the article in (today’s) Gleaner ascribed to President Paula, I wish to apprise you of the fact that the organisation was not left in the red. I agree that our biggest challenge is funding, but we are not in the red.” The Gleaner understands that prior to last weekend’s AGM, there was a board meeting to approve the audited financial statements as at June this year. Daley Morris was in attendance at that meeting along with the Chairperson of the Audit and Finance Committee, Millicent Hughes. An interim report on the income and expenses for July to October was presented to the AGM on the weekend and a balance sheet and cash balance were presented to the new president and her team. In the email, Bernard outlined that as of October 31, 2015, after all expenses associated with Netball World Cup in August had been paid, Netball Jamaica had J$6.2 million in several bank accounts. In addition to the money in the accounts, there was also in excess of $6 million coming in from sponsors, and other contracts were being negotiated. Netball Jamaica also has more than $3 million in investments. Bernard revealed that there are ongoing negotiations with Best Dressed, which is expected to return as sponsors as well as a deal for petrol for the team buses. There are also sponsorship deals from Berger Paints, Sunshine Cereals, Jamaica National Building Society, and Supreme Ventures that will be triggered early next year once the respective domestic leagues begin. There is also a deal in place with Tastee to provide meals for members of the Under-21 team up until December 31, 2015. The Under-21 team is the only one without a sponsor at this time. The past president also outlined the organisation’s debts. “Yes, we owe and the major creditor is the Independence Park Limited. The current portion of that debt is $3million. We must pay down that and I will be vigorously working to get the GOJ to write off the amount of $9 million capped at 2013,” she stated. The immediate past president warned that ill-advised public statements could only harm the association as it seeks to move forward under new leadership.last_img read more

British power handover in Iraq symbolic

first_imgBAGHDAD – Britain’s weekend handover of Basra province will have a limited effect on security in Iraq’s biggest oil region because rival Shiite warlords and local officials have been wielding the real power in the area. The British have never sought to maintain the same level of control as the Americans did over the provinces the U.S. oversaw after the 2003 invasion. Since elections in 2005, southern Iraq has been under the domain of religious Shiite parties and their militia allies. All of which means the British are handing over something local power players already possess. “I don’t think there is a handover. You’ve never had real British control of Basra or the area,” said Anthony Cordesman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “What you are really watching is a sort of nominal transfer of authority to the central government and Iraqi forces.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champStability in Basra and southern Iraq is key not only to security, but also to whether the all-important oil industry will grow and attract vital international investment. The region contains most of Iraq’s proven oil reserves. If bloody fighting between Shiite factions returns, it will be hard to persuade companies to invest. Security problems could also open the door to even greater influence by neighboring Iran and threaten land routes used by the U.S. to bring ammunition, food and other supplies from Kuwait to American forces to the north. Last Wednesday’s triple car bombing, which killed at least 25 people in Amarah, shows how fragile security in the south is. “I don’t know that there is going to be a security vacuum more than there has been,” said Frederick Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute. “The British haven’t been patrolling very aggressively anyway. The situation is never going to go back to the status before because all kinds of things have changed.” Even though Britain had long seen its influence over events in southern Iraq diminishing, the mere presence of substantial British forces offered assurances the situation in the strategic area would not spiral out of control. British officials have said they will retain the ability to help Iraqi troops quickly if widespread violence erupts, but they are also reducing the number of troops in the country from 4,500 to 2,000 by spring. In the months soon after Saddam Hussein was toppled, there were about 40,000 British troops in Iraq. The main players in Basra and southern Iraq are the powerful Shiite entities – the radical cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and his Mahdi Army militia; Abdul-Aziz al-Hakim, leader of the largest Shiite political party and the Badr Brigade militia, which has largely been absorbed into the Iraqi security forces; and the Fadhila party, which also has its own fighters and a member as Basra’s governor. Michael O’Hanlon, a senior analyst at the Brookings Institution, said Shiite rivalries notwithstanding, the security situation is not so dire as it sometimes appears. “It is more like the Wild West, or a region of competing mafia dons,” he said. “That’s not good, of course, but it’s also not horrible.” With few troops in the south, the Americans have little choice but to hope the Iraqis can handle any surge in violence or that political deals among the Shiite power brokers can prevent a blowup.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

PATRICK’S STAFF PROVE THEY REALLY ARE A CUT ABOVE!

first_imgAnd still the money for Relay For Life rolls in!We always knew the staff at Patrick Gildea Hairdressers were “a cut above.” But staff went out of their way to help others less fortunate than themselves and raised €1,700 to aid cancer research.The team are pictured with Patrick and Garvin McCloskey from Donegal’s Relay For Life.   PATRICK’S STAFF PROVE THEY REALLY ARE A CUT ABOVE! was last modified: June 7th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Patrick GildeaRelay for Lifelast_img read more